fygirlcrush:

I was really upset to just read that one of my favourite authors as a young teenager, Ned Vizzini, committed suicide yesterday. He struggled with depression his whole life and he wrote great novels for young people who felt alone, sad or unsure about their place in this world. It’s Kind of a Funny Story is one of the few books I brought with me when I moved, it had such a hopeful and optimistic tone about mental illness and that’s why I think I’m so upset about this.

I’m trying to put my finger on why I feel so unnerved by all this. I think it is because this was a man who fought a hard battle and wrote books about it that spoke to people who were also going through the same things and he ended up losing his battle. The problem with depression is it never really goes away, it just takes a sideline until it sees an opportunity to flare up again. It’s not fair.

I think the best way to honour Ned’s memory is to keep talking to mental health and keep talking to each other. The holidays are a hard time and please, be kind to each other. Don’t be ashamed to ask for help. Although Ned’s story has an unhappy ending, yours doesn’t have to. Here are some resources (feel free to add on):

  • Suicide: 800-SUICIDE (800-748-3433) / 1-800-237-TALK, 1-800-784-8433
  • Kids Help Phone: 1-800-668-6868
  • Rape/Sexual Assault: 800-656-HOPE (800-656-4673)
  • Self Harm: 899-DONT-CUT (800-366-8288)
  • LifeLine: 1-800-273-8255
  • Sexuality: 800-246-PRIDE (800-246-7743) / 1-888/THE-GLNH
  • Grief Support: 650-321-5272 
  • Depression Hotline: 1-630-482-9696 AA/ALA (family & friends of recovering alcoholics): 888-4AL-ANON (888-425-2666)
  • Domestic Violence: 866-331-9474 
  • Teen Relationships: 650-259-7136 Eating Disorders: 847-831-3438 
  • Post Abortion/Pro-Voice: 1-866-439-4253 Trevor Project: 1-866-488-7386 
  • Runaway:1-800-843-5200, 1-800-843-5678, 1-800-621-4000



nothing says hope quite like flowers growing through the cracks in concrete

(Source: jonnovstheinternet)


jedavu:

Born in Denmark in 1978, John Kenn spends his days writing and directing television shows for kids. When he has time between TV and his twins, he draws his creepy little monster drawings on post-it notes, peeking into a little window into a different world, made entirely on office supplies.